Koins YouTube Videos

Loading...

Friday, September 30, 2011

Halloween Hustle 5K Run in Kaysville, Utah


Monica Woodland, a participant in the July 2011 expedition to Kenya, is hosting a Halloween Hustle 5K run on Saturday, October 29 at Barnes Park in Kaysville, Utah.

There are lot of fun activities planned, including adult and children 5K walk/run, a costume contest, pancake breakfast and raffle prizes.

All proceeds from this activity are tax deductible, and will go directly to Koins for Kenya, for the building of a large community water cistern in Mnyenzeni, Kenya.

You can register online at: http://halloweenhustle.regtix.com

Come join this fun family event, and help Koins for Kenya build a cistern.

Asante sana!

IVL





Sunday, September 18, 2011

Monkey Business - A post by Karen Timothy

Photobucket
A monkey on the balcony of a hotel room in Mombasa, enjoying his stolen goodies

            We arrived in Mombasa, Kenya after 2 long days of travel.  Our flight had taken us from Salt Lake to Portland then on to Amsterdam for a 12 hour layover and day in the city, then to Nairobi and finally to Mombasa.  Rather than get right back into vans and head for the village, we spent the night at a hotel on the beach and got a welcome night’s sleep in a real bed.  Our room looked out on the Indian Ocean and we had a good view of the swimming pool and dining room from our balcony.  The next morning while I was getting ready for the day, I could hear Tara laughing as she called me to come see something.  As I joined her on the balcony, I couldn’t believe my eyes.  Everywhere we looked there were monkeys running around - jumping on the pool furniture, running on the beach….even sneaking into the dining room of the hotel!

Photobucket
Monkeys on the beach

They looked like a little gang of thugs as a group of them would congregate by the pool then suddenly one would dart into the dining room while the others watched.  A few seconds later it would come screaming back out with a roll or a sugar packet in its hand, being chased by a waiter wielding a big stick.   The monkey gang would watch the chase with great interest then when they were well away from their pursuer, they’d pounce on the victor and devour the spoils.  After they’d eaten they’d settle down for a minute but before long one more would dart into the dining room and the same scene would play out all over again.  We watched this happen over and over until we finally had to go down to breakfast.  Sure enough, as we were sitting there, in dashed a monkey who ran around the buffet, grabbed a roll, and zipped back outside with a waiter on its heels.  The waiter soon came strolling back in with the unruffled look of someone who had just finished polishing the silverware on his face so we assumed this routine was only new and amusing to us.

Photobucket
Monkey contemplating how to break into a hotel room
Photobucket
Babboon at safari restaurant, looking for opportunity

             In thinking back, I’m not sure there were any doors that could have been closed to prevent the monkeys from entering.  The dining room opened up onto a nice patio through big open arches and I can’t help but smile as I think of how differently we would handle a “monkey problem” in one of our restaurants!  Apparently it’s kind of a common thing because toward the end of our trip we had a similar problem.  We had been able to get a 24-hour pass to an animal preserve so we spent an evening and the following morning at a hotel located near an elephant water hole.  On our way to dinner that night we got a kick out of the signs posted everywhere that read,  “Do not feed the baboons.” Sure enough, the next morning at breakfast, Sue left her seat for a moment and a baboon came running the full length of the dining room, jumped up and grabbed her roll then darted off.  What is with monkeys and rolls??!!  Curt had his back to the entrance so he hadn’t even seen it coming. Sue saw the whole thing from across the room and it kinda spoiled her appetite.  It was sort of a “Guess Who’s Coming to Dinner” moment!


Photobucket
Lioness on the prowl
Photobucket
Zebra on the plain
Photobucket
One of hundreds of elephants we saw while on safari
By the way…while on the preserve we saw giraffes, zebras, baboons, warthogs, vultures,  impala, lions, water bucks, kudu, one hippo, water buffalo, jackal, dik dik, ostriches, gazelles, and more elephants than you could shake a stick at.  At our first elephant sighting we were SO ecstatic, clamoring all over each other to get a good picture.  By the end it was  like…”Dang! I can’t see anything– there are too many elephants in the way!”

Karen Timothy - July expeditioner
Photos by Taylor Hoyt - July expeditioner

Thursday, September 1, 2011

Abel Paulsen - Eagle Scout and Humanitarian

Photobucket
Abel and the children of Mnyenzeni, Kenya

I have recently been reading the blog and watching the videos on the website and felt inspired to write something. I can't put into words how much I appreciate Koins for Kenya. All they have done to change my life, the lives of others, and the lives of many Kenyan children. When I first heard about this opportunity, I liked it, but I had doubts that I would be able to do it and that I would be able to raise the money that I needed. I knew it would be fun, but I didn't know if it would be better to just do a typical paint-a-fence type of eagle project. Over the course of about two weeks, I was faced with a tough decision. I prayed and prayed on what to do and after about two and a half weeks, I knew that it was my duty to go to Kenya. I am so glad I made that decision. I have noticed a major change in my life and have seen the outstanding differences between two different worlds.  It is like opening the curtains to a bright warm sun on my face in the morning. I have noticed all of my blessings that I take for granted and think "Why Me?" What did I do to have more than these kids that are so poor? They work their butts off every day to get a small meal and a nice dirt floor to sleep on. 

Photobucket
Abel playing with the village kids in front of the KCC

Anyway I'm rambling.  This adventure has changed me for the better.  I love Kenya from the bottom of my heart and wish that these kids will get the opportunities that they deserve.  I hope to help these kids as much as I can.  I pray for them everyday and hope everyone in this world can love.

Asante Sana,

Abel Paulsen              



 _________________________________________________________________

Photobucket
Abel and Kim in Amsterdam

Abel was the youngest (and quietest) member of our July 2011 expedition.  He came to Kenya with his aunt, Kim Raybould.  He and his scout troop raised over $1,000 with a curb address painting project, and that money went towards building desks that were donated to the new Gona classrooms built by the Tingeys.  Abel worked hard in the workshop for several days, alongside Kenyan men, to build the sturdy desks that will each seat 3-4 students.  Without the desks, students would sit on the floor.

Photobucket
Abel building desks at the workshop

Photobucket
Abel and one of the desks he built

Photobucket
Kim and Abel in a finished desk

Photobucket
A classroom full of desks built by Abel

Photobucket
A typical classroom, 3-4 students per desk

Photobucket
Abel and Patrick

Abel shadowed Patrick for a day, accompanying him to his classes at Miyani Primary school, then going home with Patrick and participating in the work associated with daily Kenyan life.

Photobucket
Abel and Eric, his new buddy

I observed Abel at the Sean Michels School for special needs children, interacting with the kids there, and winning over Eric, the young son of Jemimah, the matron at the SMS.  Where the other white people would want to hold Eric or get into his personal space, Abel held out a ball and enticed Eric over to him, then taught Eric how to throw and catch the ball.  Able made a lifelong friend that day.  Abel blew bubbles with Beja, who was delighted by the interaction. The rest of the children at the SMS were drawn to Abel and his kind smile.  Before we left that day, many of them posed for photos with Abel.

Photobucket
Abel and Eric playing with a ball

Photobucket
Abel blowing bubbles with Beja



Photobucket
Abel helping the SMS kids with an art project

Photobucket
Abel and one of the SMS boys

Abel came to Kenya as a typical American teen.  He left a humanitarian.

Photobucket
Abel headed to the Gona school celebration

Photobucket
Abel receives a kikoy and the Duruma name, Mshenga

Asante,

IVL

Photobucket
Abel having a safari adventure